From 1 - 10 / 287
  • Categories  

    During the ArcticNet annual cruises of the research icebreaker CCGS Amundsen, characteristics of the surface sea water (temperature, salinity, dissolved CO2 and O2) are monitored in conjunction with properties of the near-surface atmosphere (basic meteorological elements, incident radiation, CO2 concentration) to observe the relationship between the surface microclimate and the air-sea exchange, with particular interest in CO2. Central to this integrated dataset is an under-way sea water pCO2 system (General Oceanics 8050) attached to the ship's clean water intake. The following variables were measured continuously and logged at 1 minute intervals: -pCO2sw (LI7000 gas analyzer) -Equilibrator water temperature -conductivity -pH -dissolved O2

  • Categories  

    DMSP and DMS water concentrations were determine at fixed depths and at selected stations (ArcticNet stations) along a transect beginning in the North Water Polynya, going through the Lancaster Sound and the Northwest Passage, and terminating in the Beaufort Sea. During transit time, near surface DMS measurements were conducted every 2 hours from the pumping system of the CCGS Amundsen. In all cases, DMSP and DMS measurements were done following the methods of Kiene and Slezak 2006 (Limnol. Oceanogr.: Methods 4: 80-95). At selected stations, DMSP and DMS microbial cycling was determined during onboard incubations following the 35S-DMSP protocol (Merzouk et al. 2006, Deep Sea Res. 53:2370-2383).

  • Categories  

    During the ArcticNet annual cruises of the research icebreaker CCGS Amundsen, characteristics of the near-surface atmosphere are monitored in conjunction with surface sea water properties to observe the relationship between the surface micro-climate and the air-sea exchange , with particular interest in CO2. Central to this integrated dataset is an eddy covariance system used to monitor fluxes of CO2, H2O, heat and momentum. The system continuously sampled the following variables at a rate of 10 Hz (instrument used to collect each variable is in parentheses, and approximate instrument height above surface is indicated): -3D wind velocity (Gill WindMaster Pro ultra-sonic anemometer) - 15m -Sonic air temperature (Gill WindMaster Pro ultra-sonic anemometer) - 15m -CO2 molar concentration (LI7500 open path gas analyzer) - 15m -H2O molar concentration (LI7500 open path gas analyzer) - 15m -CO2 mixing ratio (LI7000 integrated into a closed path system) - 15m -H2O mixing ratio (LI7000 integrated into a closed path system) - 15m -3D ship motion - angular rates and accelerations (MotionPak, Systron Donner) - 13m All instruments were mounted on a meteorological tower on the bow of the research icebreaker CCGS Amundsen.

  • Categories  

    Air, water (grab and passive) and zooplankton samples were collected from on board the CCGS Amundsen in the summer of 2016 as a part of ArcticNet and the Northern Contaminants Program. These samples were collected to determine the occurrence and levels of legacy pesticides and new and emerging priority compounds under the Canadian Chemical Management Plan. Additionally, archived sediment and filtered water samples were screened for and found microplastics.

  • Categories  

    Genelal description: Ice cores, samples of nilas and snow samples, under-ice water and a sample of frost flowers were taken in the Amundsen Gulf (Canadian Arctic) onboard the CCGS Amundsen. Methology: We used corer to collect ice cores and frost flowers and we used ice cage to collect nilas. We collected descriptive variables for the snow and frost flowers, ice cores and nilas, and for under ice water. For all samples, we measured pH, salinity and conductivity. Back in our university-based laboratories, we studied elemental composition of samples and we carried out scanning electron microscopy.

  • Categories  

    Continuous measurements of emissivity at 89 and 37 GHz frequencies in vertical and horizontal polarizations at a fixed elevation angle of 55 degrees during transit and scanning elevation angles of 30-150 degrees at every station were acquired. The radiometers were installed at the 200 level on the CCGS Amundsen icebreaker on the port side. Generally the instruments acquired data at the fixed elevation angle during transit, and 3-5 scans were performed at every station along with auxiliary data collection (GPS data, geographic location of the station, photographs of the same field of view, air temperature, wind data, atmospheric conditions, surface characteristics, etc.). The acquired data are in binary format which is produced for every scan and fixed modes. The time in the data logger is generally set to UTC. An example filename would be 'RADDAT-2007-11-06-122647.DAT'.

  • Categories  

    Ocean Mapping Group acoustic data generated from the 2010 multibeam sonar survey on the 2010 CCGS Amundsen ArcticNet Cruise. The data include high-resolution bathymetry and acoustic backscatter imagery collected 24 hours a day, whenever the ship was in transit or had dedicated survey time.

  • Categories  

    Raw backscatter data were collected from a CT25K ceilometer. A ceilometer is a device that uses a laser or other light source to determine the height of a cloud base. Ceilometers can also be used to measure the aerosol concentration within the atmosphere. Sampling took place from July to November 2009 in the southern Beaufort Sea and the Amundsen Gulf (Canadian Arctic) during the CFL cruise onboard the CCGS Amundsen icebreaker. The Circumpolar Flaw Lead System Study (CFL) is an IPY-funded project. Data were collected (1) during the ship transit, (2) set transects, (3) at several stations where we stayed 24 hours, and (4) at multi-day drift stations. The instrument was running continuously during the CFL project, with only minor interruptions for maintenance activities.

  • Categories  

    The CTD data was obtained during the 2009 ArcticNet scientific cruise #0902a with the participation of Imperial Oil Ltd. (IOL). The data were collected from July 18 to 27, 2009, aboard the CCGS Amundsen. There were 24 casts associated to 22 stations, located in the Ajurak Block prospection site. The following parameters were measured: temperature, conductivity and pressure (with a Sea-Bird SBE-9plus), dissolved oxygen (Sea-Bird SBE-43), pH (Sea-Bird SBE-18-I), fluorescence (Seapoint chlorophyll fluorometer), nitrate concentration (Satlantic MBARI-ISUS 5T), transmittance (Wetlabs C-Star transmissometer), currents (RDI LADCP), turbidity (UVP 5), light intensity (PAR; Biospherical Instruments QCP2300) and surface light intensity (sPAR; Biospherical Instruments QCP2200). Quality control procedures were applied to the data. Data are available on the Polar Data Catalogue and at the Marine Environmental Data Service (MEDS) of Fisheries and Oceans Canada.

  • Categories  

    The datasets present new data from microscopic counts and selected nutrient and physical data assembled from the following missions. Aboard the CCGS Louis St-Laurent: IPY Canada's Three Oceans 2007. Aboard the CCGS Amundsen: International Polar Year (IPY) Circumpolar Flaw Lead Study 2008; ArcticNet 2008. Temporal coverage is July-September. Cell density of the three sub-clades MAST-1A, MAST-1B and MAST-1C was measured by cell-counts using fluorescent in situ hybridization with taxa-specific probe. Biomass of phototrophic organisms, of different size classes, was obtained by counts of DAPI-stained cells under epifluorescence microscopy. Samples for total chlorophyll a (chl a) were filtered onto GF/F filters, extracted in either ethanol or acetone and analysed by spectrofluorometry. Chl a was also measured for the < 3 µm size fraction, and chl a in the < 3 µm size fraction was calculate by simple substraction. CCGS Amundsen data: Temperature, salinity, transmissivity, oxygen, and photosynthetically active radiation were provided by Dr. Y. Gratton (Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Québec). Nitrate and Phosphate concentrations were provided by Dr. J.-É. Tremblay (Université Laval, Québec). CCGS Louis St-Laurent data were supplied by Drs. E.C. Carmack and J. Nelson (Institute of Ocean Sciences, Sidney, B.C.). Distance to ice edge was obtained from the Canadian Ice Services (http://ice-glaces.ec.gc.ca).